Sunday, November 9, 2008

Are You a New Cook?



Sometimes those of us who have been cooking for many years, forget that a new cook doesn't always know the "lingo" used in recipes and in preparing food. Another thing we take for granted is the shorthand often used in printing recipes.
I use them often when typing my recipes. Here's a table to explain some of the abbreviations.

t. = teaspoon
T. = Tablespoon
c. = cup
oz. = ounce
doz. = dozen
pt. = pint
qt. = quart
pk. = peck
gal. = gallon
lb. = pound (who knows why?)



Now how do these convert to larger measurements? This is a good table to use:

3 t. = 1 T.
4 T. = 1/4 c.
5 1/2 T. = 1/3 c.
8 T. = 1/2 c.
10 2/3 T. = 2/3 c.
12 T. = 3/4 c.
16 T. = 1 c.

2 T. = 1 liquid oz.
1 c. = 1/2 pint
2 c. = 1 pt.
4 c. = 1 qt.
4 qt. = 1 gal.
8 qt. = 1 pk.
4 pk. = 1 bushel

Sometimes you'll discover that you have an already opened package or just a partial amount left. Do you have enough? This is a conversion table of commonly used items in the kitchen:

2 T. butter = 1 oz.
1/2 c. butter = 1/4 lb. or 1 stick
1 square of chocolate = 1 0z.
1 T. cornstarch = 2 T. flour
1 c. chopped nuts = 1/4 lb.
11 finely crumbled graham crackers = 1 c.
6 2/3 T. cream cheese = 1 3 oz. pkg.
1/2 c. evaporated milk and 1/2 c. water = 1 c. milk
1 lemon = 2 1/2 to 3 T. juice
grated peel of 1 lemon = 1 1/2 t.
1 orange = 6 to 7 T. juice
grated peel of 1 orange = 1 T.





f you like this blog, please look for my other blogs:
Thyme for Herbs
Happenstance House
Tickling the Ivories

1 comment:

Mildred said...

This is very helpful information. Thanks for sharing. Hope you are feeling better today. Blessings, Mildred